FANDOM


2102 Atlantic hurricane season (Hypotheticalseasons7547's version)
First system formed June 1, 2102
Last system dissipated November 15, 2102
Strongest storm James – 910 mbar (hPa) (26.88 inHg), 185 mph (295 km/h)
Total depressions 18
Total storms 17
Hurricanes 11
Major hurricanes (Cat. 3+) 5
Total fatalities 231 direct, 98 indirect
Total damage $12 billion (2102 USD)
Atlantic hurricane seasons
2100, 2101, 2102, 2103, 2104
Related article

The 2102 Atlantic hurricane season was an above-average season due to a La Nina event. It featured Newfoundland's worst strom since 2010's Hurricane Igor, one of the largest Atlantic hurricanes ever recorded, and a rare merger of two tropical cyclones.

Season summary

Tropical Storm Paul (2102)Tropical Storm Olga (2102)Hurricane Nathan (2102)Hurricane Larry-Margaret (2102)Hurricane Larry-Margaret (2102)Hurricane James (2102)Hurricane Iva (2102)Hurricane Ellie (2102)Hurricane Cat (2102)Hurricane Brent (2102)Tropical Storm Aeryn (2102)Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale

Storms

Tropical Storm Aeryn

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration June 1 – June 5
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

On May 29, a low pressure system from an old front began moving westward and organizing. A tropical depression formed on June 1. Increasing wind shear slowed intensification, but the storm intensified into Tropical Storm Aeryn. The center reformed to the northeast, and the shear abated. Aeryn intensified into a 60 mph tropical storm. Increasing shear caused the storm to weaken, and it made landfall with winds of 45 mph. The storm slowed and turned to the northeast, never moving far inland. It became a remnant low on June 5, and dissipated the next day. Rainfall totals were low due to the shear pushing most of the convection offshore.

Tropical Depression Two

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration June 16 – June 18
Peak intensity 30 mph (45 km/h) (1-min)  1015 mbar (hPa)

On June 16, a tropical wave unexpectedly formed into a tropical depression. None of the forecast models forecasted its genesis, not even the most aggressive ones. It was very weak and fast all through its lifetime. It dumped rain on Haiti and Jamaica, but the storm's fast movement limited rainfall totals. It sped toward the Gulf of Mexico, where conditions were forecast to be favorable, but its brief interaction with the Yucatan Peninsula destroyed its feeble circulation. An unforecast upper level low formed and generated enough wind shear to prevent the depression from regenerating. The remnant trough made landfall in Tampico, Mexico.

Hurricane Brent

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration July 13 – July 19
Peak intensity 105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  966 mbar (hPa)

On July 8, a tropical wave began gradually organizing into a tropical cyclone. A tropical depression formed on July 13. Conditions were favorable in its area, and it developed into Tropical Storm Brent later that day. It gradually strengthened into a hurricane. A TUTT caused the storm to weaken into a tropical storm, but said TUTT dissipated, allowing the storm to strengthen again. It gradually strengthened as it moved through the Caribbean Sea. It peaked as a Category 2 hurricane, with winds of 105 mph. It weakened slightly before making landfall in the Dominican Republic, but still packed winds of 100 mph. Steering currents suddenly collapsed, causing the storm to meander over Hispaniola until its dissipation on July 19. Due to the damage and deaths caused by winds, flooding, and mudslides, the name "Brent" was retired from the naming list and replaced with "Bryan."

Hurricane Cat

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration July 15 – July 21
Peak intensity 120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  952 mbar (hPa)

On July 13, an unusually strong front dipped into the Gulf of Mexico. A low formed on the tail end of it, and moved toward Florida. It made landfall in that state, but the wetlands there allowed for continued development. It formed into a tropical depression hours later, and strengthened into Tropical Storm Cat shortly after emerging into the Atlantic. It strengthened at a pretty good rate, and made to a Category 3 hurricane. It passed uncomfortably close to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Luckily, the worst of it passed just to the east of that area. It weakened to a Category 2 hurricane, and passed very close to Cape Cod, Massachusetts. That area recorded a peak wind gust of 99 mph, and a maximum sustained wind of 86 mph. It weakened to a Category 1 hurricane, and mover right the coast of Nova Scotia. It then turned extratropical, and quickly weakened soon after. It dissipated just 16 hours after becoming extratropical, despite packing hurricane-force winds at the time of transition.

Hurricane Denzel

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration July 25 – July 29
Peak intensity 75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)  984 mbar (hPa)

On July 23, a trough of low pressure form a front and a tropical wave merged. The merged system organized, and became a tropical depression two days later. Initially, the depression was forecast to strengthen into a weak to moderate tropical storm (upon which it would receive the name "Denzel"), then become extratropical. However, the depression strengthened more quickly than forecast, and became a hurricane. The hurricane soon began weakening. However, the weakening was surprisingly slow, and the storm remained fully tropical. There now was a very real possibility of the storm making landfall on the Iberian Peninsula before becoming extratropical. On July 28, the storm finally began transitioning into an extratropical storm due to an approaching cold front. The storm became extratropical just before landfall in northwestern Spain. Twelve hours later, Denzel was absorbed by the front.

Hurricane Ellie

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration August 3 – August 8
Peak intensity 105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  953 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave began organizing on August 1, and developed into a tropical depression two days later. Twelve hours after that, it developed into Tropical Storm Ellie. Ellie gradually strengthened as it began recurving. An eyewall formed, and the storm was upgraded into a hurricane as it neared Bermuda. Its eyewall passed over Bermuda, which recorded a peak wind gust of 92 mph. The storm surprised forecasters by continuing to strengthen, and it reached Category 2 strength, which it retained as it passed by Newfoundland. Only then did it peak in intensity. It was Newfoundland's worst storm since Hurricane Igor in 2010. The storm transitioned into a powerful extratropical cyclone packing winds of 90 mph. It slowly weakened after that. The storm was absorbed into a larger extratropical system over the northeastern Atlantic on August 10. The name "Ellie" was retired from the naming list and replaced by "Eliza."

Subtropical Storm French

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration August 10 – August 12
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1006 mbar (hPa)

A trough of low pressure positioned beneath an upper level low began developing into a subtropical depression, which formed on August 10. It made a 90-degree turn to the east, and started affecting the Azores. The storm strengthened into Subtropical Storm French. The storm dropped some rain on the Azores, but any flooding was minor. The storm transitioned into an extratropical storm on August 12, and dissipated twelve hours later.



Tropical Storm Gwyneth

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration August 11 – August 13
Peak intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

A well-organized tropical wave exited the coast of Africa on August 11, and almost immediately formed into a tropical depression. Almost all of the forecast models predicted it to become a strong hurricane. It intensified into Tropical Storm Gwyneth 12 hours after forming. It gradually intensified, and brought heavy rain and gusty winds to the Cape Verde Islands. However, the storm ingested an unexpectedly large quantity of Saharan dust. This rapidly weakened the storm to a tropical depression, which gradually weakened for another 24 hours before decaying into a remnant low. The low dissipated on August 15.


Hurricane Harold

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration August 15 – August 27
Peak intensity 80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  980 mbar (hPa)

A tropical depression formed near the Cape Verde Islands on August 15. It strengthened into Tropical Storm Harold six hours later. Further gradual strengthening occurred, and Harold strengthened into a hurricane. Later, conditions gradually deteriorated, and the storm started to weaken. It was downgraded into a tropical storm, then a depression. The depression was forecast to soon decay into a remnant low. However, it was persistent. For several days, it defied predictions to dissipate or decay into a remnant low. It moved slowly throughout that time. There were several times it almost degenerated into a remnant, low, but it kept generating deep convection at the last minute. Finally, on August 27, Harold failed to generate deep convection for a long time, resulting in its degradation into a remnant low. The low then accelerated and was absorbed by a front on August 28.

Hurricane Iva

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration August 20 – August 22
Peak intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  978 mbar (hPa)

On August 20, a tropical depression formed just off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. It was initially slow to intensify, and moved rapidly. It became Tropical Storm Iva 12 hours after forming. A high pressure system moved southward, forcing the storm to move southwest. Once over the Bay of Campeche, it underwent fast intensification, its pressure dropping 20 mb in just nine hours. Then, the storm peaked as a Category 1 hurricane. Increasing shear began to weaken it as it moved toward land, though it retained hurricane status at landfall. Then, a combination of further increasing shear, drying air, and interaction with mountains induced rapid weakening and dissipation. The shear pushed most of the convection onshore, causing flooding and landslides.

Hurricane James

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration August 30 – September 14
Peak intensity 185 mph (295 km/h) (1-min)  910 mbar (hPa)

A well-organized and very large tropical wave exited the coast of Africa on August 30, and soon formed into a tropical depression. It started to move north around the Cape Verde Islands, but a blocking high stopped its northward movement. It was then the depression became Tropical Storm James. James was then slow to move, but later began to pick up speed. It intensifies at varying rates -- sometimes slow, sometimes fast -- until it reached its amazingly strong peak intensity of 185 mph and 910 mb pressure. For the next 66 hours, only slight fluctuations in intensity occurred. The hurricane devastated the Northern Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. Then it made landfall in Hispaniola, causing devastation there, too. The mountains of Hispaniola, combined with the effects of an eyewall replacement cycle, caused the storm to rapidly weaken into a category 3 hurricane. The storm then closely followed the coast of Cuba, causing a great deal of damage there, too (as well as portions of the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands). Once it got into the Gulf of Mexico, it rapidly intensified into a Category 5. But soon, an eyewall replacement cycle began weakening the storm again. But then, the storm grew so that it took of 75% of the width of the Gulf of Mexico. Once it neared land, it suddelny weakened into a category 2 hurricane. It made landfall at that strength in western Louisiana After landfall, the storm continued to rapidly weaken, until it was a tropical depression. The depression turned eastward and eventually became extratropical, turned northeastward, and later merged with a front, both on September 14. During the period of the storm's life described in the previous several sentences, the storm caused flooding on much of the south central and eastern U.S. The name "James" was retired from the naming list and replaced by "Joel."

Hurricane Kathy

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration September 2 – September 7
Peak intensity 120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min)  953 mbar (hPa)

On September 1, an area of low pressure formed on the northern end of a tropical wave. Just 24 hours later, it formed into a tropical depression. It later formed into Tropical Storm Kathy and began quickly recurving. It rapidly intensified into a hurricane, but then stopped intensifying due to increasing shear and dry air. Kathy passed to the north of Bermuda, causing minor damage and flooding there. Then, conditions became extremely favorable, and Kathy quickly became a Category 3 hurricane. Cooling water temperatures caused the storm to weaken. The Weakening process became more gradual once the storm became a category 1 hurricane. On September 7, it turned extratropical, still packing hurricane-force winds. A high pressure system later caused Kathy to slow down. It continued to gradually weaken. The storm began making a 180-degree turn off the coast of northwestern France and moved even slower, causing flooding problems there. The storm then dissipated.

Hurricane Larry

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration September 17 – September 27
Peak intensity 155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  923 mbar (hPa)

On September 17, a subtropical depression formed in the Central Atlantic. It moved to the southeast, unusual for a storm at its location. It gradually acquired tropical characteristics, and eventually became a tropical depression. It soon strengthened into Tropical Storm Larry. Larry continued to move southeastward, and began a Fujiwahara interaction with Tropical Storm Margaret. The two storms merged, and the combined storm was referred to as Larry-Margaret because the two storms had the same pressure before merging. The merger disrupted the thunderstorm activity, and dry air prevented the thunderstorm activity from recovering. This caused the storm to weaken into a tropical depression. It was on the verge of becoming a remnant low when a burst of deep convection -- with cloud tops reaching record heights -- formed over the storm. The storm intensified into a Category 2 hurricane in just 12 hours. The storm's intensification then slowed, taking 18 more hours to intensify into a Category 3 hurricane, and 36 further hours to category 4 hurricane. The storm peaked just shy of a Category 5 hurricane. The storm began to weaken due to an eyewall replacement cycle and cooler waters. It passed to the west of Bermuda, causing very strong winds and heavy rains there. The storm then moved into an area of very strong steering currents. This caused the storm to accelerate to a very fast pace, and was heading right for Maine. The storm made landfall in Maine with winds of 115 mph, the first landfalling major hurricane ever recorded in the state of Maine, causing unprecedented damage there. The storm began rapidly weaken, but it entered the Canadian province of New Brunswick while it still had winds of 100 mph, causing unprecedented damage there as well. The storm became extratropical over the Gulf of St. Lawrence with winds of 80 mph. It then slowed its weakening process, and was still a powerful extratropical cyclone as it battered Newfoundland with winds of 70 mph, and moved into the northern Atlantic. The name "Larry" was retired from the naming lists and replaced with "Logan."

Hurricane Margaret

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration September 18 – September 27
Peak intensity 155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  923 mbar (hPa)

On September 18, a well organized tropical wave formed into a tropical depression near the Cape Verde Islands. It brought heavy rain and gusty winds to those islands. The depression strengthened into tropical storm Margaret and began a Fujiwahara interaction with Tropical Storm Larry. The two storms merged, and the combined storm was referred to as Larry-Margaret because the two storms had the same pressure before merging. The merger disrupted the thunderstorm activity, and dry air prevented the thunderstorm activity from recovering. This caused the storm to weaken into a tropical depression. It was on the verge of becoming a remnant low when a burst of deep convection -- with cloud tops reaching record heights -- formed over the storm. The storm intensified into a Category 2 hurricane in just 12 hours. The storm's intensification then slowed, taking 18 more hours to intensify into a Category 3 hurricane, and 36 further hours to category 4 hurricane. The storm peaked just shy of a Category 5 hurricane. The storm began to weaken due to an eyewall replacement cycle and cooler waters. It passed to the west of Bermuda, causing very strong winds and heavy rains there. The storm then moved into an area of very strong steering currents. This caused the storm to accelerate to a very fast pace, and was heading right for Maine. The storm made landfall in Maine with winds of 115 mph, the first landfalling major hurricane ever recorded in the state of Maine, causing unprecedented damage there. The storm began rapidly weaken, but it entered the Canadian province of New Brunswick while it still had winds of 100 mph, causing unprecedented damage there as well. The storm became extratropical over the Gulf of St. Lawrence with winds of 80 mph. It then slowed its weakening process, and was still a powerful extratropical cyclone as it battered Newfoundland with winds of 70 mph, and moved into the northern Atlantic. The name "Margaret" was retired from the naming lists and replaced with "Megan."

Hurricane Nathan

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration September 30 – October 2
Peak intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  986 mbar (hPa)

On September 30, a tropical depression formed in the Gulf of Mexico from a tropical wave. It moved rapidly northward, and quickly strengthened into a tropical storm (upon which it was given the name "Nathan"), then a hurricane. It made landfall in Louisiana with winds of 85 mph. The storm turned eastward due to a ridge of high pressure. dominating the Eastern and Central U.S. The storm then weakened as quickly as it strengthened. It became a tropical storm, then a depression, and then merged with a front 12 hours after becoming a tropical depression.


Tropical Storm Olga

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration October 15 – October 16
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1002 mbar (hPa)

A low pressure system in the Gulf of Mexico developed into a tropical depression on October 15. Favorable conditions allowed it to gradually strengthen. It then became Tropical Storm Olga later on October 15. Olga continued to gradually strengthen, and it made landfall in Florida on October 16. A front then induced wind shear, causing the storm to weaken. Olga was absorbed by the same front on the eastern coast of Florida.



Tropical Storm Paul

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration October 20 – October 20
Peak intensity 40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)

A tropical wave crossed the Yucatan Peninsula on October 18. It entered the Bay of Campeche and organized. It formed into a tropical depression on October 20, and was soon upgraded to Tropical storm Paul. Paul did not have much time to strengthed further before making landfall in Mexico. The storm then rapidly weakened and later dissipated.




Tropical Storm Raquel

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex 150px
Duration November 11 – November 15
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1001 mbar (hPa)

A subtropical depression formed in the Central Atlantic. It moved to the west-northwest with little change. A trough pick it up, causing it to slow and turn to the east-northeast. During this time, it became tropical. The storm sped up, but soon slowed down again, due to the trough collapsing, causing the storm to slow again. It finally began to organize, and turned to the north-northwest. Another trough began to pick it up, and in began to speed up again. It strengthened into Tropical Storm Raquel and curved to the northeast continuing to slowly strengthen. It then became extratropical, weakened, and merged with the trough on November 15.

Storm Names

  • Olga
  • Paul
  • Raquel
  • Spencer (unused)
  • Tanya (unused)
  • Van (unused)
  • Wendy (unused)

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.