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The 2100 Pacific hurricane season was the most active Pacific hurricane season on record in terms of named storms. It started on May 15, 2100 for the East Pacific and June 1, 2100 for the Central Pacific, and ended on November 30, 2100 in both basins, dates that conventionally delimit the the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

Forecasts

Predictions of tropical activity in the 2100 season
Source Date Named
storms
Hurricanes Major
hurricanes
Average (1971–2006) 15.3 8.8 4.2
Record high activity 28 16 (tie) 10
Record low activity 8 (tie) 3 0 (tie)
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
NOAA May 26, 2100 19-25 11-15 7-10
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
  Actual activity (as of October 1) 38 23 16

On May 26, the Climate Prediction Center released its pre-season outlook. The scientists stated a 15% chance of a below-normal season, a 40% chance of a near-normal season and a 45% chance of an above-normal season. The climatologists expected 19–25 named storms, with 11–15 becoming hurricanes, and 7–10 becoming major hurricanes. The above-normal activity forecast was because despite being in moderate to strong La Niña conditions, wind shear was abnormally low and sea surface temperatures (SST's) were at near record high levels.

Season summary

Timeline of tropical activity in the 2100 Pacific hurricane season

Wikipedia:Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale

The 2100 Pacific hurricane season, unlike the Atlantic season, didn't start until the end of June due to the moderate La Niña conditions. However, the inactivity abruptly halted on June 27 with the formation of Tropical Depression One-E. The depression became Tropical Storm Andres on June 29, the latest date for a season's first named storm to a Pacific hurricane season since 1969, when the first storm (Tropical Storm Ava) developed on July 1. Despite the late start, Tropical Storms Andres, Blanca, and Carlos all were named in a span of 18 hours, which forecasts called the harbinger to an active season. Following the rapid start, nine named storms developed in July. This was the most active July since the start of the Pacific satellite era in 1971 in terms of named storms (breaking the previous record of seven set in 1985), and it also marked the first time since August 2009 that any month produced nine total storms. With the record active July, 2100 became the first season since 1985 to have 12 tropical storms form before the end of July. The month of August was even more active, with 11 total storms forming, breaking the record of nine set in 1968 and 2009. By the end of August, 23 total storms had formed, well ahead of the previous record of just 16 (set in 1985). Even though the La Niña actually intensified in September, 14 total storms formed, more than double the previous record of six set in 1966 and 2005. As of October 1, the number of storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes are all at record high levels.

The season's current accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) is 244 (Eastern Pacific - 191, Central Pacific - 53).

Rapid storm formation

Beginning with Hurricane Hilda, every Eastern Pacific forming storm broke the record for the earliest forming nth storm. The following tables provide more in-depth details of this year's exceptionally rapid storm activity:

Eastern Pacific

Early formation of storms in 2100
Storm # Formation Day Name Previous Record Difference
1June 29AndresAlma , One-E and Aletta - May 14, 1990 , May 14, 1996 and May 14,2012 +46 days
2June 30BlancaBud - May 22, 2012 +39 days
3June 30CarlosConnie - June 8, 1974 +22 days
4July 4DoloresDolores - June 14, 1974 +20 days
5July 6EnriqueElida - June 26, 1990 +10 days
6July 11FeliciaFausto - July 3, 1984 +8 days
7July 15GuillermoGenevieve - July 7, 1984 +8 days
8July 17HildaHilda - July 19, 1985-2 days
9July 20IgnacioIgnacio - July 21, 1985-1 day
10July 20JimenaJimena - July 21, 1985-1 day
11July 27KevinKevin - July 29, 1985-2 days
12July 30LindaLinda - July 31, 1985-1 day
13August 4MartyMarty - August 7, 1985-3 days
14August 4NoraNora - August 21, 1985-17 days
15August 4OlafOlaf - August 24, 1985-20 days
16August 12PatriciaPauline - August 31, 1985-19 days
17August 13RickRick - September 2, 1985-20 days
18August 22SandraSandra - September 7, 1985-16 days
19August 24TerryTerry - September 16, 1985-23 days
20August 28VivianVivian - September 20, 1985-23 days
21September 3WaldoWinifred - October 7, 1992-34 days
22September 6XinaXavier - October 14, 1992-38 days
23September 10YorkYolanda - October 16, 1992-36 days

Central Pacific

Early formation of storms in 2100
Storm # Formation Day Name Previous Record Difference
1August 8AkoniEkeka - January 28, 1992 +192 days
2August 15EmaHali - March 29, 1992 +139 days
3August 18HeneMoke - September 4, 1984 -17 days
4September 4IonaIwa - November 19, 1982-76 days

 

List of storms

 

Tropical Storm Andres

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Barry 2013.jpg
Duration June 27 – June 30
Peak intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

Andres was a short-lived tropical storm that did not affect land.

Tropical Storm Blanca

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Florence 2012.jpg
Duration June 29 – July 3
Peak intensity 65 mph (105 km/h) (1-min)  996 mbar (hPa)

Blanca was a strong tropical storm that did not affect land.

Hurricane Carlos

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Cosme 2013.jpg
Duration June 30 – July 6
Peak intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  988 mbar (hPa)

Carlos was a minimal hurricane with no land effects.

Hurricane Dolores

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Dalila Jul 1 2013 1845Z.png
Duration July 3 – July 9
Peak intensity 100 mph (160 km/h) (1-min)  966 mbar (hPa)

Dolores was a moderate hurricane with no land effects.

Hurricane Enrique

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Tina 30 September 1992.png
Duration July 6 – July 21
Peak intensity 160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  917 mbar (hPa)

Enrique was tied with Hurricane Felicia later that year as the strongest July cyclone recorded in the East Pacific, surpassing the record set by Gilma in 1994 (it reached 920 millibars (mb)). It made landfall over Coronado, California as a tropical depression on July 30 (the first California landfalling tropical system since Norman in 1978), causing $500 million (2100 USD) dollars in damage, but no deaths.

Hurricane Felicia

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Felicia aug 6 2009 1940Z.jpg
Duration July 11 – August 3
Peak intensity 160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  917 mbar (hPa)

Felicia was the longest lasting Pacific hurricane since Hurricane Tina in 1992 (until its longevity was exceeded by several other storms that year), and it was tied with Hurricane Enrique earlier that year as the strongest July tropical cyclone. Despite its longevity and strength, Felicia did not affect land.

Hurricane Guillermo

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Kenneth 11 September 1993.jpg
Duration July 14 – July 29
Peak intensity 145 mph (230 km/h) (1-min)  946 mbar (hPa)

Guillermo was a long-lived intense hurricane, but it did not affect land.

Hurricane Hilda

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Adolph 23 May 1983.jpg
Duration July 17 – July 26
Peak intensity 115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min)  951 mbar (hPa)

Hilda was a powerful hurricane with no land effects.

Tropical Storm Ignacio

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Fernand.jpg
Duration July 20 – July 22
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Ignacio was a short-lived tropical storm that did not affect land.

Tropical Storm Jimena

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Helene 2012.jpg
Duration July 20 – July 22
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  995 mbar (hPa)

Jimena was a short-lived tropical storm that did not affect land.

Tropical Depression Eleven-E

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration July 24 – July 24
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

Tropical Depression Eleven-E was a short-lived tropical depression that did not affect land.

Hurricane Kevin

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Tico 18 October 1983.jpg
Duration July 27 – July 29
Peak intensity 80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

Kevin was a minimal hurricane that did not affect land.

Tropical Storm Linda

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Gabrielle 2013.jpg
Duration July 30 – August 4
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  999 mbar (hPa)

Linda was a tropical storm that made landfall near Puerto Vallartaon August 2 as a tropical storm, causing $100 million (2100 USD), but no deaths.

Tropical Depression Qualia

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
10L Sept 12 2013 1655Z.jpg Qualia 2100 track.PNG
Duration July 30 (Entered Basin) – July 31
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

The remnants of Atlantic Hurricane Qualia survived over the terrain of Mexico to briefly become a tropical depression, but dissipated before causing any deaths or damage.

Hurricane Marty

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Igor.jpg
Duration August 3 – August 26
Peak intensity 165 mph (270 km/h) (1-min)  905 mbar (hPa)

Marty was a long-lived intense hurricane that brought hurricane force winds (but didn't make a landfall) to San Francisco, California (the first storm to bring hurricane force winds to California since 1858), causing $400 million (2100 USD) dollars in damages, but no deaths. Marty was the strongest August Pacific hurricane on record (beating Hurricane Guillermo in 1997(which had a pressure of 919 mb)) until Patricia and Rick later that year surpassed it.

Tropical Storm Nora

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
IreneSep1819711948UTCESSA9.gif
Duration August 4 – August 6
Peak intensity 55 mph (90 km/h) (1-min)  994 mbar (hPa)

Nora was a short-lived tropical storm that made landfall near León, Nicaragua on August 6 as a tropical storm, causing a horrendous $2 billion (2100 USD) dollars in damage, but amazingly, no deaths were reported. A portion of Nora's remnants survived into the North Atlantic, but dissipated before regenerating.

Tropical Storm Olaf

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Martha1969.png
Duration August 4 – August 6
Peak intensity 55 mph (90 km/h) (1-min)  994 mbar (hPa)

Olaf was a short-lived tropical storm that made landfall near Carrillo, Costa Rica as a tropical storm on August 6 (the first Pacific landfalling Costa Rica system on record), causing a staggering $1 billion (2100 USD) dollars in damage, but no deaths were reported. Similar to Nora, a portion of Olaf's remnants survived into the Atlantic but dissipated before regenerating.

Tropical Storm Akoni

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Ekeka feb 2 1992 0221Z.jpg
Duration August 6 – August 9
Peak intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  988 mbar (hPa)

Akoni was a Central Pacific tropical storm that did not affect land.

Tropical Depression Two-C

Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Pewa 2013.jpg
Duration August 8 – August 8
Peak intensity 30 mph (45 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

Lasting barely 12 hours, Tropical Depression Two-C was the shortest lived tropical cyclone of the season (it didn't affect land).

Hurricane Patricia

Category 6 hurricane (NHC)
Linda 12 sept 1997 2200Z.jpg
Duration August 10 – August 29
Peak intensity 185 mph (295 km/h) (1-min)  902 mbar (hPa)

Patricia was an extremely intense hurricane, tying with Linda in 1997 as the strongest Pacific tropical cyclone on record (until Rick later that month and then Waldo in September broke the record). Despite its longevity, Patricia did not affect land. When Patricia became a Category 5, it marked the first time four Category 5 hurricanes formed in one single Pacific hurricane season, breaking the record of three set in 1994 and 2002.

Hurricane Rick

Category 6 hurricane (NHC)
Ioke.JPG
Duration August 12 – September 7
Peak intensity 190 mph (305 km/h) (1-min)  898 mbar (hPa)

Rick was an exceptionally intense and long-lived hurricane, becoming the strongest Pacific hurricane on record, beating Linda in 1997 and Patricia earlier that same year (the two storms had 902 mb pressures) (until it was surpassed by Hurricane Waldo later that year), and the longest-lasting Pacific hurricane on record, beating Hurricane Tina in 1992. Despite its record-breaking intensity, Rick did not affect land.

Hurricane Ema

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Iwa 24 nov 1982 0102Z N7.jpg
Duration August 14 – August 20
Peak intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  992 mbar (hPa)

Ema was a minimal hurricane that did not affect land.

Tropical Storm Hene

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Omeka 2010-12-19 0057Z.jpg
Duration August 16 – August 19
Peak intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

Hene was a short-lived tropical storm that did not affect land.

Hurricane Shary

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Celia june 24 2010 2055Z.jpg Shary 2100 track.PNG
Duration August 16 (Entered Basin) – August 22 (Exited Basin)
Peak intensity 160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  924 mbar (hPa)

Atlantic Hurricane Shary crossed into the East Pacific for six days before reentering the Atlantic. It made landfall near Puerto Vallarta, Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane, causing $900 million (2100 USD) dollars in damage, but no deaths occured.

Hurricane Sandra

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Darby jun 25 2010 1955Z.jpg
Duration August 21 – September 2
Peak intensity 125 mph (200 km/h) (1-min)  953 mbar (hPa)

Sandra was a long-lived intense hurricane that did not affect land.

Hurricane Terry

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Carlotta 11 july 1988 2254Z.jpg
Duration August 24 – August 30
Peak intensity 110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min)  966 mbar (hPa)

Terry was a moderate hurricane with no land effects.

Tropical Storm Vivian

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Lorena 2013.jpg
Duration August 28 – August 30
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  997 mbar (hPa)

Vivian was a short-lived tropical storm that brought minor amounts of percipitation to Baja California Sur.

Hurricane Waldo

Category 6 hurricane (NHC)
Tip.jpg
Duration September 1 – September 20 (Exited Basin)
Peak intensity 195 mph (310 km/h) (1-min)  894 (Pacific record low) mbar (hPa)

Waldo was a long-lived intense hurricane (the strongest Pacific hurricane on record, breaking Rick's short-lived record) that did not affect land.

Hurricane Iona

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Unala 2013.jpg
Duration September 4 – September 7 (Crossed into the West Pacific)
Peak intensity 80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  991 mbar (hPa)

Iona was a minimal hurricane that had no land effects.

Hurricane Xina

Category 3 hurricane (SSHWS)
Boris 29 May 1984.jpg
Duration September 6 – September 19
Peak intensity 115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min)  953 mbar (hPa)

Xina was a long-lived intense hurricane that did not affect land.

Hurricane York

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Epsilon ISS012-E-10097.jpg
Duration September 10 – September 17
Peak intensity 90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min)  986 mbar (hPa)

York was a minimal hurricane with no land effects.

Hurricane Keli

Category 5 hurricane (SSHWS)
Lekima Oct 23 2013 0020Z.jpg
Duration September 11 – September 15(Exited Basin)
Peak intensity 160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)  899 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Zelda

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
JuneNov219690456zESSA9.jpg
Duration September 12 – October 30
Peak intensity 155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min)  900 mbar (hPa)

Hurricane Able

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
John aug 5 1982 2332Z.jpg
Duration September 16 – October 10
Peak intensity 130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min)  911 mbar (hPa)

Storm names

See also: List of retired Pacific hurricane names

The following names will be used to name storms that form in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean in 2100. Retired names, if any, will be announced by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in the spring of 2101. Names that were not assigned are marked in gray, and the names of storms currently active are marked in bold. A storm was named York for the first time in 2100.

NOTE: An Atlantic storm, Hurricane Shary, crossed into the Pacific and kept is Atlantic name and number.

  • Andres
  • Blanca
  • Carlos
  • Dolores
  • Enrique
  • Felicia
  • Guillermo
  • Hilda
  • Ignacio
  • Jimena
  • Kevin
  • Linda
  • Marty
  • Nora
  • Olaf
  • Patricia
  • Rick
  • Sandra
  • Terry
  • Vivian
  • Waldo
  • Xina
  • York
  • Zelda

Central Pacific

For the central Pacific Ocean, four consecutive lists are used, with the names used sequentially until exhausted, rather than until the end of the year, due to the low number of storms each year. The next eight names on the list are shown below. Storms were named Hene and Iona for the first time in 2100.

  • Akoni
  • Keli
  • Ema
  • Lala (unused)
  • Hene
  • Moke (unused)
  • Iona
  • Nolo (unused)

See also

2100 Atlantic hurricane season

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